“Immigration Bill, I Hardly Knew Ya” I Say on Current TV

I actually didn’t say this but this thought contains a legitimate question: the immigration bill survived nearly intact as it passed the judiciary committee on its way to a full Senate vote as early as next week. But what will it look like if it gets to President Obama’s desk for signature?

Immigrant participating in 'Time is Now' rally for immigration reform on April 6, 2013 in Jersey City, New Jersey.

An Immigrant and Lady Liberty Courtesy: John Moore/Getty Images and Univision

In the Senate, Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions used his habla to object almost ad infinitum with talking points virtually ripped from the discredited Heritage Foundation immigration report. Although he was overruled in  committee, hold the air kisses! Securing the 60 votes isn’t going to be easy.

Still the real immigration bill drama will be in the House of Representatives. The opposition cast of characters includes Texas Congressman Lamar Smith who has come out against the Senate version for being too soft on immigrants here illegally and not tough enough on border security, a sentiment echoed by House Judiciary committee chair Virginia Congressman Bill Goodlatte.

In 2007, the immigration proposal died on the Senate floor. This time, the focus is on the House where the internecine Republican battles between gradients of conservatism are most sharp. This is also where the culture of a constant campaign is exacting the most pressure: these lawmakers must answer to constituents and special interests groups every two years, when they are up re-election.

This is just one of the topics discussed on Current TV’s Viewpoint with John Fugelsang which also included the role of Spanish language media in combating misinformation and informing a big stakeholder–the immigrant population. We also talked about the exclusion of the LGBT provision that would have allowed same-sex spouses to apply for a green card.

Click below to hear this clip.

Click to read more of my posts on politics and immigration.

Where do you see the biggest risk for the immigration bill–the Senate or the House?

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